Persecution is something from which we should not run.  We should not despair if it happens and we should not hold our head low.  Why?  Because persecution is a clear sign that we are following in the footsteps of our Master.  We are more deeply united to Christ as a result of persecution than we could ever realize. 

 

Ponder today any form of persecution or injustice you suffer for the sake of your faith and embrace of the Gospel.  The Lord wants to use that if you let Him.

 

 

Lord, I do surrender to You all that weighs me down.  I give any suffering I receive for being Your follower.  May I not only imitate You in Your suffering, but also in Your willing embrace of it.  Jesus, I trust in You.

(My Catholic Life)

 

 

 

May 15, 2020

Friday of the Fifth Week of Easter

It is a good spiritual practice to regularly reflect upon the fact that God chose us even before we were born.  He knew us from all eternity and set His eyes upon us, longing to bring us into His fold.  We need to understand this, accept it and believe it.  We do belong.

God not only chooses us to belong to Him, He also chooses us for His mission.  He wants to use us to go and bear fruit for His Kingdom.  He wants to use us for a sacred purpose and a divine calling.  Being a member of His “team” means that our lives have purpose and meaning.  No matter how “unqualified” we may feel at times to make a difference, we must remember that God does not see us that way.  Rather, He sees the infinite potential within each of us and chooses to use that potential for the building up of His Kingdom.

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

These words from Jesus, once again, reveal the intimate unity He has with His Father.  He and the Father are one and what He says also comes from the Father.  John’s Gospel is filled with this language as a way of highlighting their perfect unity.

Though there is much we could say about the unity of the Father and the Son, it’s important to remind ourselves that these words spoken by Jesus should also ideally be words we speak.  How wonderful it is to be able to say that WE also do not speak on our own but that the Father speaks through us.  This should be our constant goal. (My Catholic Life)

 

Lord, give me Your words to speak.  Help me to always turn to You in

my heart in confidence so that You are the source of all truth and

goodness.  May that truth and goodness come forth from me each and

every day.  Jesus, I trust in You.   

 

 

May 8, 2020
Friday of the Fourth Week of Easter

  

“In my Father’s house there are many dwelling places. If there were not, would I have told you that I am going to prepare a place for you? And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come back again and take you to myself, so that where I am you also may be.”  John 14:2–3

In the passage above we are given a very consoling image of Heaven.  It’s the image of the “Father’s house.”  This image is a good one to reflect upon because it reveals that Heaven is our home.  Home is a safe place.  It’s a place where we can be ourselves, relax, be with loved ones, and feel as if we belong.  We are God’s sons and daughters and He has decided that we belong there with Him.  

 

Reflecting on this image of Heaven should also console those who have lost a loved one.  The experience of saying goodbye, for now, is very difficult.  And it should be difficult.  The difficulty of losing a loved one reveals that there is true love in that relationship.  And that is good.  But God does want the feelings of loss to also be mingled with joy as we ponder the reality of our loved one being with the Father in His home for eternity.  They are happier there than we will ever be able to imagine, and we will one day be called to share in that joy.

 

Reflect, today, upon this image of Heaven: our Father’s House.  Sit with that image and let God speak to you.  As you do, let your heart be drawn to Heaven so that this desire will help to direct your actions here and now. (My Catholic Life)    

 

 

May 7, 2020 

Thursday of the Fourth Week of Easter

 

When Jesus had washed the disciples’ feet, he said to them:
“Amen, amen, I say to you, no slave is greater than his master
nor any messenger greater than the one who sent him.

John 13:16

  

As we grow in our ability to let God take control of our life, we must also regularly enter into an attitude of thanks and praise of God for all that He does in us.  We must point all the glory to Him for letting us share in His mission and for being sent by Him to fulfill His will.  He is greater in every way, but He also wants us to share in that greatness and glory.  So, the good news is that when we glorify and thank God for all He does in us and for all the dictates of His law and His commands, we will be elevated by God to participate in and share in His glory!  This is one fruit of the Christian life that blesses us beyond what we could ever come up with ourselves.

 

 

Reflect, today, upon letting

yourself become a complete

slave of God and His will

today.  That commitment will

start you down a path of

tremendous delight.

 

Lord, I submit myself to Your every command.  May Your will be done in
me and only Your will.  I choose You as my Master in all things and trust

in Your perfect love for me.  Jesus, I trust in You.(
My Catholic Life) 

   

 

 


Unity is hard.  It takes a tremendous amount of love.  It means being fully present to the other, seeking to fully understand, accept and know them.  And the Trinity is our model for this.  Be it parents and children, spouses, friends or others, we are called to a deep and abiding unity.

 

Reflect, today, upon your relationship with God and how that relationship shines through in all other relationships you have.  Commit yourself more fully to knowing and loving God so that others around you may also benefit from your love of Him. 

 

   

 

 

May 5, 2020
Tuesday of the Fourth Week of Easter

 

  




 

Lord, I so often do not
let myself hear You
plainly through the gift
of faith.  I so often want
the easy answer to the
difficult questions.  Help
me to  grow in patience
so that I may know You
and allow You
to become my true
 


Shepherd.  Jesus, I trust in You.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

The Voice of the
Shepherd

 

May 4, 2020

Monday of the Fourth Week of Easter

 

The Gospel today gives us insight into this internal struggle in that it contrasts the voice of the Shepherd with the voice of a stranger.  The sheep are easily taught and conditioned.  They learn the voice of their shepherd 

because it was common practice for shepherds to regularly speak to their sheep.  Once the sheep became used to the shepherd’s voice, they would turn and follow him when he called . 

 

 

“I am the good shepherd. A good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep. A hired man, who is not a shepherd and whose sheep are not his own, sees a wolf coming and leaves the sheep and runs away, and the wolf catches and scatters them.  This is because he works for pay and has no concern for the sheep.” John 10:11-13

(My Catholic Life)

 

 

 

“But whoever enters through the gate is the shepherd of the sheep.  The gatekeeper opens it for him, and the sheep hear his voice, as the shepherd calls his own sheep by name and leads them out. ”  John 10:2-4

 

Four things happen in this story:

 

First, the gatekeeper opens the gate for the shepherd. Second, the shepherd calls his own sheep by name. Third, the sheep hear his voice. Fourth, the shepherd leads the sheep through the gate.

 

The gatekeeper is the Holy Spirit.  The role of the Holy Spirit is to open our minds to the truth, to a deeper understanding of Scripture, and therefore, to a deeper understanding of Christ Himself. 

 

Jesus, the Good Shepherd, will speak your name, personally. 

 

“Hearing” Christ speak to us in this personal and intimate way should motivate us to action.

 

Jesus, the Good Shepherd, Who calls you by name, leads you “through the gate.”  Jesus Himself is the Gate. (My Catholic Life)